Tick-tock: why the clock is ticking on getting a property listed, sold and closed in 2017

 

Forgive us if it sounds a little odd to be “counting down” on real estate sales and closings for 2017 but in reality, this is the case as we approach mid-August. How so, you say?

There are several key factors that create this tightening timeline:

1) Seasonal slowdown:
Our market unit sales volume steadily eases from its peak in April, May and June to the start of winter hibernation in mid to late November when things are really quiet for 60-90 days. Sales are progressively lower for each month following the end of June to the end of year and unit sales are lowest in December and January. Most buyers don’t want to move in during the winter (if they have a choice) and seeing properties in the winter and making a buying decision is more challenging.

Many buyers also like to get moved in time to enjoy Xmas season in their new home or before the snow flies, in early to  mid-December.

2) time-to-sell and time-to-close
Typical selling time in our strong market for midrange properties should be 30 days or so and remember one must add at least a week for a buyer to firm up their conditions.

Most buyers are looking for a 45-60 day closing period, particularly first time buyers or those coming from rental properties where 60 day notice to the existing landlord is required.

3) prep and lead time to get a property on the market:
There are always a few more things to do to get ready for professional photos and for the onslaught of strangers visiting your home at the outset of a listing period. Realtors need time to schedule photography, sign installation and marketing, so this “prelist” phase in most cases, will be at least 7-10 days.

While every property and sale will differ, adding the above takes somewhere in the order of 75-100 days, so the typical property listed by the end of August, is most likely to sell and close somewhere between mid-November and mid-December.

These timelines may be further skewed or lengthened if the property being sold is a higher priced or unique property or presents some selling challenges.

The best thing a prospective seller can do is to check with a Realtor and see how these timelines apply to their own property and what the likelihood is for success in line with the seller’s expectations. Though we have a strong market this year and listing inventory is much lower than in recent years, it is important to remember that rate of sale for the balance of the year is quite different than what we have seen in the last 3-6 months.

If you are not currently working with a Realtor, please feel free to give us a call and we will be happy to provide a no cost no obligation market evaluation of your property and how we might be able to assist. For more information or to get check out more information on Ottawa real estate, please see our online co-ordinates below.

Gord McCormick, Broker of Record
Dawn Davey, Broker
Oasis Realty Brokerage
613-435-4692 or 613-371-9691
oasisrealty@rogers.com   oasisrealtyottawa.com
https://www.facebook.com/  oasisrealtyottawa/

@oasisrealtyOTT   http://blog.oasisrealtyottawa.com/

A lower commission brokerage, 11th year in business

Ottawa broker rant: real estate listing photos

is this really a key feature of this home?

 

 

 

 

 

 

We really do have a lot of excellent people in our profession and it is on behalf of all these quality sales people and brokers that we offer the following rant on what we feel are really poor real estate practices by some that should not reflect poorly upon us all!

The “snow in June” listing photos:
C’mon guys!…how tough is it to pop by your listing and get a photo update? How is one serving the seller by telegraphing that the listing has been on the market for quite a while…sheesh!

The 1 photo or no photo listing:
Do you think that this is going get people’s attention or that they will come back to check out the listing later?….keep dreamin’!

Too many listing photos:
6 photos of the front door or the bowl on the dining room table….who needs this? There are very few properties that cannot be effectively shown with 25-35 quality photos that show the layout with some perspective.  Some artsy photographers get carried away but few consumers (and trust me, way fewer buyer agents) want to click through 100+ photos!)

The focus on something you’re not buying photos:
How many listings do you see where the focus is the flower arrangement, the staging, the accent wall, the furniture, the artwork, the dining room table, the knick knacks, etc. Do I really need to see a close up of a vase in the middle of a table when I can’t see the room it’s in?

The (old) cellphone photo:
Some of the listing photos we see look like they were taken with an old flip phone. I guess it works for those going for the dark and fuzzy look…but it does nothing for the online viewer and even less for the seller.  This works especially well (not!) with text that brags about the “bright, airy space with lots of natural light”.

The companion photo set is the one from the agent with the latest and most expensive phone but you can tell they took all the listing photos in about 2 minutes (while walking through the property-hence the blur), since they had to rush off and get the Beamer detailed, pick up their commission cheque or get to their mani-pedi, workout or yoga.

The missing photo scam:
Do you really think that smart consumers won’t figure out the yard is ugly, there are hydro towers or an expressway in the backyard, the garage is falling down, the roof is doomed or that the Army Corps of Engineers are needed for kitchen and bathroom renos?

The super wide angle photo:
…don’t you just love the ones where the fridge or stove looks 6-8 feet wide?

The “why-is-this-in-the-photo?” photos:
Sometimes you just have to shake your head at the unusual things that catch your eye in listing photos. The pet, the diaper pail, the garbage can, the Realtor reflection in the shower door or mirror, the car in the driveway, dishes in the sink….anything that distracts the buyer from assessing the house for their needs is bad news.

The-too-many-too-few conundrum:
Condo listings specialize in this awful practice: you get 3 photos of the unit and 12 of the view, the building complex, lobby, gym, pool, or neighbourhood/surrounding area.  Sure you have a great park or bike path down the street but I want to see the darn place I may be buying!

The “why bother” photo set:
Tenant occupied properties lead the way but are not the only source of incredibly messy, disorganized properties that are clearly not ready for prime time. To be honest, some are so scary; you hope you never have a customer call who might want to see one of these suckers!  You are not doing yourself or the seller any favours by listing those in this condition…so why bother?

Shame on you for not investing in professional photos!
Our industry in Ottawa is serviced by many excellent and reasonably priced photographers who do fantastic photography and hosting services at very reasonable rates. If you are listing someone’s property and asking them to pay $15,000-$20,000 (or more) in commissions and won’t shell out $150 to get some decent photos done? …sorry, you shouldn’t be in the business! Oh, and by the way…shame on your brokerage and manager, too!

The “I-forgot-what-the-point-was” photo spread:
The objective of the exercise is to have the prospective buyer see enough of the key features of the property that they will want to come and see it in person and soon! The photos should highlight the critical features, be consistent with the text and be just enough to keep them wanting more.  Too often, these simple objectives seem to be forgotten.

More of the same (and worse!) in the video world:
All of the above issues and more are present in the now ever present video/Utube/social media marketing which is far from an exact science for the amateur productions too many turn out to be.

If we have forgotten any mind boggling real estate photo practices that you see regularly, please let us know!

 

Gord McCormick, Broker of Record
Dawn Davey, Broker
Oasis Realty Brokerage
613-435-4692 or 613-371-9691
www.oasisrealtyottawa.com    oasisrealty@rogers.com

A full service, lower commission brokerage

 

 

 

 

 

Ottawa real estate “stellar” midway through 2017

 

 

 

 

 

The Ottawa Real Estate Board (OREB) June results report another strong month of sales and price gains. Virtually every indicator is positive and suggests continuing growth in the months to come.

Average prices and unit sales continue upward trend:
Our best average price increases in many years with the average residential selling price up 7.2% to $427,721 and the average condo up 6% to $274,974 through the first half of 2017.

Unit sales:
Residential unit sales are up by 10.8% and condos by 26.2% on a year to date basis.

Listing inventory plummets:
 The one somewhat challenging statistic is the continuing decline in new listings (-10.3% year to date) and the overall listing inventory at the end of June which shows the number of residential listings down 27% from a year ago and condos down 22.2%.  (compared to historical highs at the end of June 2015, residential listings are down 36.4% and condos down 28.1%)  This is a good situation for those selling but not so much for buyers.

These inventory levels suggest continuing strong demand for the foreseeable future.

New home sales up 44%
The Ottawa Home Builders Association reported that housing starts are up 44% this year to date, compared to last-so builders are seeing very strong activity also. Accordingly, builder prices have bumped up this year and buyer incentives have generally decreased from a year or two ago.

More sales falling through:
Conditional sales that do not firm up normally run about 5 or 6% but we notice that this is up to more like 8 or 10% this year. This may be caused by buyers who make an offer quickly and then have some buyer remorse.  Another possibility may be that sellers are less inclined to adjust prices after home inspections discover some latent issues, thus causing buyers to walk on signed conditional agreements.  Tighter mortgage qualifying rules may also be a factor.

These sales “fall throughs” are worrisome, as they effectively take a property off the market for 5-7 business days and then potentially leave a stigma as to why the deal did not proceed which may turn other buyers away from the property.

More offer dates and multiple offers:
We are seeing many more offer dates or “no offers before”, as listing agents try to ensure as many buyers as possible get exposure to the property to optimize value for their sellers. Ottawa has always been more of an “early-bird-gets-the-worm” type of market but listing scarcity and stronger demand are forcing more agents and sellers to hold back offers. Note: while multiple offers have certainly increased this year they are not the norm, generally only a small %  (perhaps 5%) will see multiple offers and over listing price sales., although this may be higher in very high demand neighbourhoods.  There is a tendency for some in our industry to be over enthusiastic and make it sound like every property is selling overnight and with multiple offers and an over list price result.  This may lead to faulty expectations and perhaps some impulsive buying and selling decisions.

The average days on market to sell a property (though improved) is still 40 days for residential properties and 60 days for condos.

So it is a strong market which brings some different challenges than we faced a year or two ago and buyers and sellers are encouraged to stay engaged with their industry professional to be fully on top of the market dynamics.

Gord McCormick, Broker of Record
Dawn Davey, Broker
Oasis Realty Brokerage
613-435-4692 or 613-371-9691 (mobile)
Oasisrealtyottawa.com

Quality brokerage services at lower commissions, 11th year in business

 

 

 

 

 

Why “discounter” shouldn’t be a dirty word in real estate

do discount brokerages work?
do discount brokerages work?

We took a different path from most in organized real estate when we started our own independent brokerage. We had previously worked with two large international franchise brokerages and felt we could offer a very viable service at much lower commission than is necessary to support the infrastructure a large franchise brokerage requires.

We have done this successfully for 10 years now and our sellers pay 20-40% less than the typical 5% commissions charged by most of those working for brand name brokerages.  This can add up to thousands in $ commission and HST savings for those who work with us, particularly as house prices continue to rise.

How we can do it:
We have been able to provide excellent service and save our sellers a lot of money because we don’t have the overhead of the corporate franchise structure, so we can afford to provide the same level of service at a much lower price. Sounds like a win for the consumer, right?

So what’s the problem?
The problem is far too many consumers are led to believe that “discounter” is a dirty word (if not even a lower life form!) when used to describe a salesperson/brokerage that does not charge the more typical 5% commissions. Somehow the perception has been created that such brokerages offer lower levels of service and are “not as good” as the higher priced brokerage.

Realtor school 101:
Within the first month or two a new Realtor will attend a seminar or sales meeting on “handling the commission price objection” and they will all be taught the similar FUD (fear-uncertainty-doubt) to explain to a prospective seller why they should pay a much higher fee rather than go with the lower priced service provider.

“These firms don’t last long”

“These firms don’t advertise”

“Other Realtors won’t sell your listing”

“You get what you pay for”

Without going in to detail, these types of statements are simply untrue and disparaging a competitor in this fashion is contrary to Realtor codes of ethics and may be anti-competitive, too-yet it happens every day over kitchen tables, in blogs/websites and on radio shows… “ya gotta watch some of these discounters” might even be a tag line for some 5% Realtors.

Who wouldn’t like lower commissions?
Our experience tells us that most consumers would like to see lower commissions yet many are afraid to embrace the dreaded “discounter” because of continued fear-uncertainty and doubt spread by the higher priced agents.

Shop your local, independent brokerage!
Smaller and independent brokers are more likely to have a viable and lower cost MLS® listing model, since administrative, management and franchise fees are all lower for these firms and there are many good smaller brokerages here in Ottawa.

So if you believe that real estate commissions should be lower then don’t be swayed by corporate FUD and choose a lower commission or discount broker for your real estate needs. Many firms like ours are out there and offer some innovative service models that might work for you….so don’t be afraid to work with a non-name brand firm or affiliated Realtor.

To take advantage of our low cost programs for full service MLS® listings or buyer representation services, give us a call at 613-435-4692 or check us out online at the co-ordinates below. Excellent preseason listing rates of only 3% or 3.5% currently in effect.  The cash you are saving is your own!

(subject to change without notice, some conditions apply, not intended to solicit existing listings)

Gord McCormick, Broker of Record
Dawn Davey, Broker Oasis Realty Brokerage
613-435-4692 or mobile 613-371-9691
oasisrealty@rogers.com oasisrealtyottawa.com

One of the highest ranked and “liked” real estate pages on facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/oasisrealtyottawa/

Follow us on Twitter for “all the real estate news that’s fit to post”  https://twitter.com/OasisrealtyOTT

One of Ottawa’s best real estate blogs: http://blog.oasisrealtyottawa.com/

A full service, boutique brokerage with lower listing fees

Will it be a “balanced” market or a “seller’s” market in 2017?

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
Lots of these in Ottawa January 2017
Listing inventory is trending down which may indicate a market favouring sellers
Listing inventory is trending down which may indicate a market favouring sellers

Though January is typically the lowest sales month of the year, (along with December) there are some very positive trends in the current market.

Strong residential sales in January 2017:
Unit sales have been trending up steadily since April 2016 and January continued that trend. Unit residential sales were up a solid 16.6% for the month and overall residential and condo sales were 8.6% higher than the 5 year average for January.  Condo unit sales were flat in January but did sell at a higher price than a year earlier.

Listing inventory trending down:
This is a key category and indicator of overall market activity. We experienced several years (2013-2015) of increasing inventory levels which led to a supply/demand imbalance favouring buyers.  Starting in spring 2016 this indicator started moving in the opposite direction and moved in to a balanced position during 2016. See chart:
https://public.chartblocks.com/c/5895b4b79973d295631e48dc via @chartblocks

January 2015 listing inventory is 15.2% lower for residential listings and 10.7% lower for the number of condo listings, compared to a year ago.
New listings in January were 11% lower than a year ago and condo listings for the month 4.6% lower.

Balanced market or seller’s market?
If we continue the combination of higher unit sales with lower numbers of new listings and total listing inventory, then we may see more pressure on buyers and higher prices and move more towards a seller’s market.  This is what can occur when demand outstrips supply and can be characterized by shorter selling times, higher prices and the existence of more multiple offers on listings.  We have not had sellers market conditions (except perhaps at a neighbourhood level) for 4 or 5 years now, here in Ottawa.

We have also had reports of strong sales from builders on new construction and inventory homes.

Prices:
Overall average prices are not leaping forward, as has been the case for the last number of years but the trend suggests this could change if supply limitations drive prices up.

Bottom Line:
This is a very important time of year for both buyers and sellers, as market activity grows on a daily and weekly basis from now through peak season in May and June, so it is a good idea to get one’s plans in place and existing properties ready to sell.

These overall numbers may not apply to all neighbourhoods, so if you would like to get an analysis done for your own property or area, feel free to give us a call or call your Realtor. 613-435-4692

Gord McCormick, Broker of Record
Dawn Davey, Broker Oasis Realty Brokerage
613-435-4692 or mobile 613-371-9691
oasisrealty@rogers.com oasisrealtyottawa.com

One of the highest ranked and “liked” real estate pages on facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/oasisrealtyottawa/

Follow us on Twitter for “all the real estate news that’s fit to post”  https://twitter.com/OasisrealtyOTT

One of Ottawa’s best real estate blogs: http://blog.oasisrealtyottawa.com/

A full service, boutique brokerage with lower listing fees

When should I list my Ottawa home or condo? (part 2)

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
Should I wait until summer to list my house?

This is a question we often hear and the answer depends on the individual homeowner circumstances and objectives. Quite often the “best time to list” discussion is determined by other factors but here are a few items to consider in a listing and timing strategy:

Spring is King:
The April through June period is by far our busiest sales time here in Ottawa and our ratio of new listings to sales is also strongest during these months. Competition is also the heaviest then as well, so sellers with overpriced listings may not realize it until it is too late to react to market feedback.

February-March are great lead in months:
Open houses are full of buyers in February and March, so this can be a good time to be listing also.  If buyer feedback suggests listing tweaks there is time to adjust before peak sales season.

Don’t avoid listing in Summer!
Contrary to real estate myth, the 2nd best selling season is July-September based on monthly sales.  While one often hears that “real estate is dead” in the summer and “things pick up in the Fall/after Labour Day” this is totally inaccurate when one looks at monthly unit sales history.  So don’t avoid listing in July or August, because of this Realtor equivalent of an old wives tale.

Listing timeline most often tied to purchase:
Quite often the listing timelines are dictated by when one can find their “dream home”. This can rarely be preplanned, as it is subject to the whim of what becomes available on the market and a buyer being able to successfully secure a purchase on that property.
A key issue in the purchase of a property is always the sellers’ timeline and desired closing date, so one cannot always pick when their new home will be available.

Resale property vs new construction:
Resale properties are typically available within a 45-60 closing time frame. New construction is typically much longer (except for inventory homes or model home sales) with 4-6 month lead times or longer.  This can especially complicate listing timing for a new built home that is going to close in January-March which means selling an existing home later in the year which is the slower time for the resale market.

How long will it take to sell my existing property?
Most are enthusiastic and assume their palace will sell very quickly and at the price they expect and plan for. This is quite often not the case, unfortunately.  Just over 40% of new listings sold on the Ottawa real estate board during 2016-so a fast sale is by no means guaranteed.  In fact, the average residential property took 56 days on the market to sell in 2016 and the average condo 70 days.

What are the competitive issues that will affect my sale?
The level of competitive listing activity from resale homes and new construction will vary by area and time of year but obviously have a huge effect on when and whether to list. Overall inventory levels have come down quite a bit over the last year, so this may be a pretty good year to list compared to previous years, assuming we continue to see the slightly better demand level we experienced in 2016.

Can I list my property now for a closing in 6 or 8 months?
Most resale properties close within 45-90 days of a sale on average, so by trying to listing for a much longer closing, one is decreasing the number of potential buyers and hence demand and possibly market value.

How do I “time” the market?
If peak sales are April-June, does this mean one should list in April? Or get a head start by listing in March?  Most properties look their best in mid-May or June, once leaves are back on the trees and gardens start to bloom, but is this too late to be listing?
If one thinks in competitive terms: the first person to list has the advantage of being available to buyers in the market at that time but also has the disadvantage that those listing later will be able to price their listings knowing the listing price of the earlier listing.

Do I sell first or buy first?
Age old question which varies with buyer circumstances and both have their pros and cons.  A high % of buyers with existing homes typically find their new dream home first and then put the existing property on the market but it is not unusual for someone to sell first, particularly if planning to buy in a high neighbourhood.

Bottom Line:
There are many factors which affect the timing and marketing of a property and a Realtor is best equipped to consult on all factors specific to an individual property and neighbourhood.

Gord McCormick, Broker of Record
Dawn Davey, Broker
Oasis Realty Brokerage
613-435-4692 or mobile 613-371-9691
oasisrealty@rogers.com
oasisrealtyottawa.com

One of the highest ranked and “liked” real estate pages on facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/oasisrealtyottawa/

Follow us on Twitter for “all the real estate news that’s fit to post”  https://twitter.com/OasisrealtyOTT

One of Ottawa’s best real estate blogs: http://blog.oasisrealtyottawa.com/

A full service, boutique brokerage with lower listing fees

When is the best time to list my Ottawa property?

Here is a chart we have compiled from monthly Ottawa real estate board published unit sales results (residential and condo property unit sales/month) for the last 5 years. This demonstrates a pretty consistent annual pattern in the Ottawa market.

Spring is key:
April through June are typically our peak sales months and this will come as no surprise for most. Government employees are relocating and families looking for a summer closing and move before the next school year, give this season a major boost.  Each year Ottawa real estate handles some 800-1000 moves in to town by government personnel with an equal number moving away from Ottawa.  The highest % of these are military and RCMP relocations.

Summer surprisingly strong:
There is a significant myth that “real estate is dead in summer” and this table shows this is totally incorrect! July and August are typically the 4th and 5th busiest sales months of the year, so those who “wait until the market picks up in the Fall” are really doing themselves a disservice.

March, September and October:
These are “shoulder” or transition sales months. March activity is increasing for the busy spring and September and October are marked by erosion of peak demand heading in to the slower fall and winter season.

November-February:
Ottawa sales take a breather, as fewer people want to move during the winter time and seasonal vacations, holiday activity and weather all play a role in making house buying not quite as active. A lot of planning and preparation for the peak season can be done during January and February, so still an active period-just not as many sales.

Personal Objectives most important:
What dictates selling or buying times is often based on a specific property being available and this then drives the sale of an existing home. Those with homes to sell will want to consider their buying and closing timelines in a way that optimizes selling an existing property if at all possible. For example, buying a new home that closes in February means one is selling an existing property in late fall in order to co-ordinate the new home purchase.  This however, is not the best-selling market for the existing property-so the seller will have to take this in to account when doing their pricing and listing plans.

When will my property show best?
Most properties will not show their best until mid-May when leaves are on the trees and everything has “greened up”, so some may wish to time their listing (and photo) plans accordingly. For example, a house with a pool will look much more inviting when the pool is open and warmer temperatures occur.

Is my property ready to list?
It can take longer than one thinks to get a property in HGTV condition for listing and selling, so this must be planned in to the listing cycle.

Competition also a factor:
The quality and number of head to head competitors to the property being sold (both new and resale) also factors in to the timing decision.

How long will it take my property to sell?
Sellers will have to factor in both selling and closing time in to the planning timeline and these can vary widely by location, price point and property type.

Bottom line:
There are a lot of variables to be considering in the listing, marketing and selling process and your Realtor is best equipped to help facilitate the process and optimize results based on all these factors. If one is planning a purchase or sale this year, January and February are the ideal months to sit down and have a planning discussion with your Realtor and any other key 3rd parties ie mortgage broker, stager, trades people.

If you are not already working with another Realtor, we are happy to provide a no cost, no obligation market evaluation of your property to help you with your real estate objectives.

Gord McCormick, Broker of Record
Dawn Davey, Broker
Oasis Realty Brokerage
613-435-4692 or mobile 613-371-9691
oasisrealty@rogers.com
oasisrealtyottawa.com
One of the highest ranked and “liked” real estate pages on facebook:
http://www.facebook.com/pages/Oasis-Realty-Brokerage-Ottawa/209265863918

Follow us on Twitter for “all the real estate news that’s fit to post”  https://twitter.com/OasisrealtyOTT

One of Ottawa’s best real estate blogs: http://blog.oasisrealtyottawa.com/

Fed/Brookfield IRP contract cuts Realtor commission to 3.7%

for-sale…does this cause a risk to those selling to relocate?

The federal government is cutting commission rates for Realtor services on the National Integrated Relocation contract (IRP) and Ontario Realtors will share a total of 3.7% for listing and selling a relocating government employee’s home, as of January 1, 2017. (down from the previous rate of 4.1%)

While some will cheer the move, it may not be quite so popular with relocating employees if they see a decrease in service levels or lower buyer agent interest in their listings, due to the lower compensation offered.

What are typical real estate commissions?
In Ottawa, typical commissions remain around 5%* with 2.5% going to the listing sales person and brokerage and 2.5% going to the agent and brokerage that represent the buyer. Commissions are highly competitive and are open to negotiation but most typical fees will be in this general area.* commissions are negotiable and can vary by the individual salesperson or broker and many do charge less, including Oasis Realty.

How does it work with the Federal relocation contract?
Brookfield Relocation Services (affiliated with the parent company of Royal Lepage real estate) manages the federal government Integrated Relocation Program (IRP) nationally and has done for many years. Just a few years ago, this program paid Ottawa Realtors 5% with the usual 2.5%/2.5% split.  On the last contract this dropped to 4.1%, with listing and buyer agents each receiving 2.05% over the last few years. (a decrease of 18%)

With the new fee/compensation structure coming January 1st at 3.7%, the listing representative and buyer representative will each receive 1.85%, if the 50/50 split continues (a further decrease of 9.7%)

Toronto is not Ontario and real estate is “local”:
We are not sure how these fees are established or negotiated but we strongly believe that “one size does not fit all” in real estate fees and by having one set fee for all of Ontario, this does not take in to account the vast regional and local differences. Toronto is its own market, as is Ottawa.  Smaller but important centres for Federal employees such as Trenton, Petawawa etc. may have an even bigger problem if their local prices and volume of transactions normally requires 6% fees to support.

While Toronto prices have continued on the elevator ride up to atmospheric levels, our prices in Ottawa have certainly not followed suit and even this year with solid unit sales our average prices continue to be pretty flat and at or below inflation level. So Realtors are not making up the difference in the average price of houses being sold here, as they might be in Toronto.

What risks might a relocating government seller be facing?
1) fewer Realtors may be interested in listing properties on the program, given the compensation level.
2) Realtors may also ask employees to “top up” the government paid fees, so they can achieve their usual %. This happens regularly today with those selling or buying a private listing or FSBO where a significantly lower commission rate is offered to a buyer representative.  The standard Buyer Representation Agreement signed by most buyers provides for the buyer paying incremental Realtor commission if the seller does not pay an agreed upon fee level ie 2.5%.
3) If one believes that Realtors are significantly “coin operated” then sellers may also see less interest from buyer agents in their properties, as those representatives may favour properties where the buyer representative commission is more robust. Getting paid 27.7% more on property “B” than government listed property “A” is a pretty compelling advantage.  This amounts to about $2,600 on the average $400K sale or purchase.
4) Listing agents will certainly have less budget monies for advertising and other costs to support their government listings when one considers they are also splitting commissions with their brokerage.
5) properties may take longer to sell if satisfactory “full commission” alternatives are available.

Bottom line:
Government employee sales will continue but there may be a few service wrinkles given the now “discount” fees being paid by the Federal government.

This commission change was hotly debated on a Realtor forum late in 2016, before the Board moderator cut off discussion on the issue, so there are clearly many who feel that this lower rate combined with their brokerage splits, dues/fees and other expenses makes this business less viable for them.

Oasis Realty Enhanced IRP Listing offer for government sellers!

We will offer a 2.5% co-operating buyer representative rate out of the 3.7% contract commission and this will ensure that the listing is on competitive ground with other listings in the area.  Since all Realtors can manage with a 2.5% buyer rep commission there is zero worry for the seller!
Any relocating government employee who has concerns should know we have a program that will totally eliminate any potential risk and in fact, will help make their property even more attractive. For details on our program or for a no cost, no obligation evaluation of your property, please give us a call at 613-435-4692 (not intended to solicit those with existing representation agreements)

Gord McCormick, Broker of Record
Dawn Davey, Broker
Oasis Realty Brokerage
613-435-4692 or mobile 613-371-9691
oasisrealty@rogers.com oasisrealtyottawa.com

One of the highest ranked and “liked” real estate pages on facebook:

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Should other governments follow BC’s lead on first time buyer loans?

The Province of British Columbia has recently introduced a program that will provide no interest no payment loans to help first time buyers get in the market. On first glance, this seems to be an attractive program and one that helps these buyers and the real estate market as a whole…but does it really help?

How it works:
The government is promising to match down payment funds with a loan up to $18,750 with no interest or payments for 5 years. Presumably, in year 6 the buyer would start repaying this loan or 2nd mortgage in a manner similar to the Federal homebuyers plan (HBP) where a buyer repays the amount used for down payment back in to their RRSP over a maximum period of 15 years.
This certainly helps gets buyers in to homes and helps them gain that first step on the property ladder.

Does it really help the buyer or just create further debt?
Some say that these programs are useful to a degree but like any loan…eventually, it must be paid back and further indebts the borrower…so does it really help the first time buyer? In in growth market, these types of loans are usually absorbed in higher ongoing house prices and corresponding equity growth but what if market prices plateau or drop?

Does it help the market balance or simply keep the upwards pricing trajectory?
The BC market has been hit with many sources of turbulence this year and affordability is a major concern. The government clearly feels that programs like these are needed to both help buyers get in to the market and keep a source of new home owners entering the market which helps the whole market grow (or at least maintain itself). Other monetary moves have restricted new foreign buyers and affordability and new mortgage rules have pinched the supply of new buyers entering the market which combined could have a negative effect on market health.

Other circumstances being considered:
Organized real estate through its associations has been lobbying governments to both index the amount of the HBP and widen the application of RRSP funds to other life circumstances in addition to the first time buyer program. Examples include those relocating to take up employment and those who become disabled. (although other circumstances have been mentioned in the past ie divorce/separation, caring for a family member and so forth)   While one can see how these programs could be useful to the home buyer at the time…does it not simply grow indebtedness and continue the upward price cycle of housing?
The persons using the program would have further savings capabilities curtailed while they are repaying the funds used out of the Retirement funds and losing the investment and growth value also. While it certainly helps on the housing side is it a good thing for the overall investment picture and does it put too many “eggs” in the housing “basket”?

It would not be surprising to see that there may be some appetite for a BC like program in Toronto where prices are high but we’ll have to wait and see what rolls out and how the program and BC’s real estate market fares.

Gord McCormick, Broker of Record
Dawn Davey, Broker
613-435-4692 oasisrealty@rogers.com
www.oasisrealtyottawa.com  @oasisrealtyOTT
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Selling in December: …how do I handle Christmas decorating?

When I’m selling in December…should I decorate my home?
Perhaps not the biggest question sellers and their Realtors may have on their minds late in the year but one that warrants some consideration. Christmas is an important time of the year for many of us and a big part of the excitement is decorating the home as part of the seasonal celebrations.  So if my property is still going to be listed for sale…does this change how I choose to decorate?
Bah, humbug!…don’t decorate at all!
One school of thought might be that one should not decorate at all and let buyers see the property without all the distraction that could be associated with Christmas décor.  This argument would also suggest that adding decorations personalizes the home and may detract from the overall space.
To tree or not to tree?
Christmas trees may be an important centre piece in one’s seasonal decorations; should we forego the Christmas tree this selling season?  Trees take up a lot of space and also could be quite a distraction for visitors.  While it is one’s prerogative to “tree or not to tree”, we think smaller homes and condos may show best without a Christmas tree or opt for a very small or table top sized version.
“It’s our last Christmas here…”
There is a lot of sentiment around the Holiday season and if it won’t feel like Christmas without the tree and all the trimmings then by all means “go for it”.
Withdraw or suspend listing or restrict showings:
A compromise solution might be that one either temporarily withdraws the listing from MLS® or introduces some showing restrictions during the Christmas season.  (Your Realtor has forms for doing this.)
Bottom line:
Homeowners make their own choices of course and as Realtors we also encourage sellers to balance the listing needs with their own, as they still are living in the home and should not feel that they are in some sterile environment which is void of any personal touches.  We would generally suggest that a “lite” version of one’s typical seasonal decoration is the best way to strike a compromise.
Merry Christmas and Happy selling!
Dawn Davey, Broker
Gord McCormick, Broker of Record
Oasis Realty Brokerage
613-435-4692
oasisrealty@rogers.com  www.oasisrealtyottawa.com
@oasisrealtyOTT

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